book to movie · Uncategorized

The Bone Collector (Book and Movie)

Review is taken from my goodreads review and slightly edited. Spoilers ahead.

This. This is my kind of mystery. Reminiscent of reading a Tess Gerritsen book, it was basically perfect. Creepy and atmospheric. Snarky characters. And plot twists galore.

From the description, I knew I’d probably love this book. It’s more than a simple mystery but not quite the mind screw that makes one hate humanity. Though it’ll still probably make you hate humanity a little bit. Sometimes the world is just a screwed up place.

It’s a gritty novel, sure. A bit disturbing. I’ve read worses, by far. But this one got to me because the author made it tangible. Almost like an episode of Criminal Minds, really. I’m not sure in the book the unsub used as his “bible” is real or not, but. Wow. Disturbing.

But I think what I loved more than the mystery with all of its clues and their hidden meanings, was the relationships. Especially the one between Amelia and Rhymes. What a combo of characters. Him telling her how to run a crime scene and her just balking at his… ideas. I don’t blame her, really. However, I can also imagine that “seductive voice” and probably wouldn’t mind being lured into doing whatever Rhymes talked her into doing.

Then there’s their bonding, which I adored. The switch flipped and suddenly they understood each other and bonded and became protective.

I think I know where their relationship heads… maybe. Kind of. Not sure of how it actually works out. But no matter how it all goes, I’m jumping on the ship. I cannot wait to see where they go, both professionally and personally.

I also appreciated that those that were working with Rhyme still held him in high regard despite his status. It shows respect. Even with his personality. It also shows what kind of man he had been while still actively on the job and gives a glimpse of who he once was.

I may or may not have made a mistake in listening to the Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl soundtrack while reading this book. It certainly added to how creepy and wonderful this book was.

*Gleefully adds book two to TBR and heads in search of it.*

I obviously adored the book. But the movie? Not really. 

I knew going into this that there had been name changes to the main characters last names for some unbeknownst reason. It sounds senseless, really. But whatever. I can live with that. I also don’t blame them for taking the UN thing and the FBI portion out and replacing them with the new supervisor who has Rhyme’s old job. It wasn’t essential to the plot and convoluted, actually. While that part eventually played into why Rhyme decided to live, it wasn’t needed.

I can live with them changing the races of the characters. Makes sense, looking back at it. Actually, at several times during the book, Rhymes is described as having a “seductive” voice. I can definitely imagine Denzel Washington’s voice as such.

However, when genders start getting swapped, it changes the dynamic more than a little. In the book, Rhyme continually harassed/threatened his caregiver, even though they clearly had an understanding. In the movie, him and the caregiver had a nice, loving, relationship. Which made me scratch my head. But the biggest change came in the form over how in the movie, his caregiver worried about him. I mean, in the book, his caregiver did actually worry. Thom wanted him to be more social, “get out.” So no surprise when he (Thom) became super excited and involved in the case to the point where he forgot to take care of him (Rhymes). It actually built to the point where bad things happen.

In the movie those things didn’t happen because Thelma continuously watched over him, reminding him to be careful.  See the dynamic change?

It doesn’t help that in the book Rhyme is just kind of a horrible person. Seriously. He’s rude and crude and really doesn’t give a crap. In the movie he’s nice and understanding and kind of… genteel. Part of my love for the book lies in how you love to hate his personality and watching him change.

I didn’t care for how they changed the genders of the victims. Seriously? Why? And why kill them all? Was it for harsher emotional impact? In the book, they barely save them all after the first two, but they do save them. While watching, the movie, I honestly didn’t see the point, or the need, for changing this.

Perhaps the biggest change was the motivation behind the killer. In the book, Rhyme mentions this case had worked at one point, which had almost gotten him fired. It eventually played into who the killer was and why the killer was doing what he was doing. It changed everything, honestly. I get that things are going to be taken out, but an important part to a character’s backstory? Really?

Then Amelia’s backstory was taken out. Kind of understandably, but still aggravating. It ends up playing a huge role in how she is and why, if not how, her and Rhyme come to understand each other.

And I’m still trying to figure out why they gave Rhyme a sister with a family. Seriously? What was wrong with the ex-wife from the book?

It’s not that this movie is necessarily bad. It’s a cheesy and not actually scary thriller. Or perhaps that was just because I was coming off the book. But in comparison to the book, no way. It’s not the worse adaptation out there. Not by far, but the “simple” changes they made ended up being the biggest changes of all.

Thoughts? Concerns? Leave them in the comments!

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “The Bone Collector (Book and Movie)

  1. Oooooh, great review and contrast. I’ve only seen the movie but found it not entirely enjoyable. From your description of the book I think I would like it more! I’ll need to watch it!

    1. Thanks for thinking it was great. =)

      The book was hands down fabulous. Equal parts creepy and hilarious. Five stars from me, highly recommended.

      I can do with never seeing the movie again. Although I will give it this: I will always imagine Denzel Washington (or at least his voice) as Rhyme. The one thing they got right and it was a “seductive tone of voice.” Bwahaha.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s